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atlantic_charterPolicy and Government

At Forbes.com, Nathan Lewis says the secret history of American prosperity needs to be unhidden.

John Tamny at Forbes.com, and Ralph Benko at  Forbes.com, demolish Marc Levinson’s counsel of acceptance of poor economic growth as propounded in Levinson’s new book in his new book An Extraordinary Time: The End of the Postwar Boom and the Return of the Ordinary Economy and Wall Street Journal op-ed Why the Economy Doesn’t Roar Anymore: The long boom after World War II left Americans with unrealistic expectations, but there’s no going back to that unusual Golden Age.

From Forbes.com, John Tamny writes a revolt against the experts is not necessarily an endorsement of Donald Trump.

From Christian Post, Jerry Bowyer says blood moons came and went, still no collapse.

Monetary

At The Future of Freedom Foundation, David S. D’Amato eruditely explores how the Supreme Court’s Legal Tender Cases of the 19th century “foreshadlowed “a willingness to yield to the accretion of power in the federal government; in the years to follow and throughout the next century, ever fewer fundamental rights, particularly economic rights, would rate serious judicial review, the judiciary increasingly acquiescing to government abuses of power.” (Mr. D’Amato is encouraged to also explore Julliard vs. Greenman, which inverted the interpretation of the US Constitution as denying sovereignty to the federal government.)

The Washington Post Magazine‘s Gene Weingarten (the actually funniest man in the world) explores the implications of the statement that “Janet Yellen is not and has never been chair of the Federal Reserve; she is a 9-year-old pygmy giraffe.”

In the Telegraph, Ambrose Evans-Pritchard warns inflation is a ticking time bomb for 2017.

Spending

At Forbes.com, Tim Worstall debunks Paul Krugman’s strange argument that we don’t have to worry about the national debt.

Regulatory

David Malpass says the overtime rule is very harmful to job creation.