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Politics and Government

From Forbes.com, Ralph Benko praises the new Louisville slugger as Senator Paul declares his candidacy. Also on Forbes.com, Ralph Benko details what is likely to hurt the Republicans in 2016.

From The Hill, Jim Gilmore says he has experience the 2016 GOP hopefuls lack.

Monetary Reform

In the New York Times, Binyamin Appelbaum writes In Republican Attacks on the Fed, Experts See a Shift.

Portrait of the Classical Gold Standard by Marcia Christoff-Kurapovan in The UK Market Oracle.

The world that disappeared in 1914 appeared, in retrospect, something like our picture of Paradise,” wrote the economist Cecil Hirsch in his June 1934 review of R.W. Hawtrey’s classic, The Art of Central Banking (1933).”

‘The Floating Kilogram’: The Editor of the Sun Talks About His New Book On the Dollar Crisis

In The Market Oracle UK, Marcia Christoff-Kurapovna writes: “The world that disappeared in 1914 appeared, in retrospect, something like our picture of Paradise,” wrote the economist Cecil Hirsch in his June 1934 review of R.W. Hawtrey’s classic, The Art of Central Banking (1933).

Tyler Cowen, in the New York Times, on why it is the immobility not the inequality that is the problem.

George Selgin debuts the new Alt-M.org:

Definitely Not Ben Bernanke’s Blog. 

He’s getting tired of the congratulations to the Fed for its great job.

Steve Forbes at Forbes calls for repeal of the ban on US oil exports, noting the correlation between bad monetary policy and volatile oil prices.

From Forbes.com, Ralph Benko presents the science fiction behind Paul Krugman’s economics part one and part two.

From Forbes.com, Mark Hendrickson praises John Tamny’s new book ‘Popular Economics.’

From Naked Capitalism: Ilargi: Russia’s Central Bank Governor Is Way Smarter Than Ours

John Tamny, in Forbes.com, on Wall Street’s migration to Silicon Valley.

On CNBC, Jim Grant explores the dire cost of Fed policy.

LA Times reports on how The soaring dollar puts the world on sale For Americans

From CATO, Steve Hanke writes the monetary approach reigns supreme.

The New York Fed’s Liberty Street Economics: Crisis Chronicles: The Panic of 1825 and a Most Fantastic Financial Swindle: “- The banking panic of 1825 has been called the first modern financial crisis, the first Latin American crisis, and the first emerging market crisis—but it is perhaps best known for a bond market swindle surrounding an entirely made-up Central American principality.”

From Forbes.com, Norbert Michel warns that the Fed’s interest rates threaten more than monetary policy.

Steve Forbes weighs in on how bitcoin will end world poverty.

New York Fed’s Liberty Street blog on why “policy analysis in the very oversimplified world of DSGE models is a pretty difficult business. Contrary to what it may sometimes appear from listening to talking heads, deciding which policy is best is very rarely a slam dunk.”