Weekend edition: Lewis and The WSJ on the euro; Kudlow on the President’s populism; O’Driscoll on financial bubbles.

From Forbes, Nathan Lewis defends the euro but suggests incompetence threatens the entire enterprise.

The WSJ argues the euro is still a good idea:

The Greek crisis hasn’t proved that the euro was a mistake. But the political reaction to it has placed the experiment in serious danger by abandoning the no-bailout principle and replacing it with a doctrine that sovereign default in a currency zone is unthinkable. This policy makes no more sense than saying that bankruptcy should be impossible, because no one will lend to a company if it might go bust. What’s worse is that Europe’s leadership has adopted this view for the sake of defending the Greek government from the consequences of its irresponsibility on spending and mendacity about its true level of deficit and debt.

From Heritage, Derek Scissors explains the likely futility of exchange rate manipulation on China’s trade surplus.

At NRO, Larry Kudlow suggests the President’s populist tactics demoralize the economy.

On The Kudlow Report, James Pethokoukis discusses the President’s populist turn: 





At The American Spectator, Ross Kaminsky debunks the China currency debate. 

From Cato, Gerald P. O’Driscoll, Jr. links currency instability to financial bubbles.

At The Frum Forum, Noah Kristula-Green reports on last week’s Heritage sound money conference.

On The Kudlow Report, Don Luskin analyzes the economy:



In The American Spectator, Stephen Moore argues Keynesianism is dead.

At NRO, Michael Potemra notes Steve Jobs’ supply-side brilliance.

On TGSN, Ralph Benko reports gold standard support from Hippy icon Ralph Metzner.

The Sound Money Center features an interview with Charles Kadlec.

From The WSJ, Robert Frank discusses the rising zero-sum mentality concerning tax hikes:

 

On Asia Times, Reuven Brenner suggests demographic challenges make Greek’s future bleak.

The WSJ argues Herman Cain’s plan to add a federal sales tax on top of the income tax is bad policy.

At COAL, Paul Krugman claims commodities indicate a reflation to 2007 levels, not a major inflation.

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